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Netflix cites “more entertainment choices than ever,” raises prices again

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Netflix cites “more entertainment choices than ever,” raises prices again

Enlarge (credit: Aurich Lawson | Getty Images)

On Friday, Netflix confirmed plans to raise prices for its video-streaming services in North America for the seventh time in 11 years.

Unlike many previous Netflix price hikes, this year's bump hits all three subscription options. In the United States, the "basic" tier, which is capped at 720p and includes other limits, receives its first increase in three years, jumping $1 to $9.99 per month. The 1080p "standard" tier goes up $1.50 to $15.49 per month. And the 4K "premium" tier jumps $2 to $19.99 per month. Canadian customers can expect similar jumps in prices for all three tiers as well.

Netflix says the price increases will roll out in phases to existing customers based on their billing cycles, and all customers will get no fewer than 30 days' notice before the higher prices go into effect. Brand-new customers must begin paying the higher prices immediately.

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LinuxGeek
19 minutes ago
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Raising prices while many Americans are struggling to make ends meet. I'm seriously considering cancelling my subscription. Most of their selections are pretty 'blah' anyway.
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Android users can now disable 2G to block Stingray attacks

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Google has finally rolled out an option on Android allowing users to disable 2G connections, which come with a host of privacy and security problems exploited by cell-site simulators. [...]
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LinuxGeek
4 days ago
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Only possible with Android 12 . . . So, once again privacy and security are only offered to people who can afford the latest technology.
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Humble subscription service is dumping Mac, Linux access in 18 days

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Mac, Linux nostalgia will soon be a thing for Humble Choice subscribers.

Enlarge / Mac, Linux nostalgia will soon be a thing for Humble Choice subscribers. (credit: Aurich Lawson | Getty Images)

Humble, the bundle-centric games retailer that launched with expansive Mac and Linux support in 2010, will soon shift a major component of its business to Windows-only gaming.

The retailer's monthly subscription service, Humble Choice, previously offered a number of price tiers; the more you paid, the more new games you could claim in a given month. Starting February 1, Humble Choice will include less choice, as it will only offer a single $12/month tier, complete with a few new game giveaways per month and ongoing access to two collections of games: Humble's existing "Trove" collection of classic games, and a brand-new "Humble Games Collection" of more modern titles.

Launcher cut-off: February 1, 2022

But this shift in subscription strategy comes with a new, unfortunate requirement: an entirely new launcher app, which must be used to access and download Humble Choice, Humble Trove, and Humble Games Collection games going forward. Worse, this app will be Windows-only. Current subscribers have been given an abrupt countdown warning (as spotted by NeoWin). Those subscribers have until January 31 to use the existing website interface to download DRM-free copies of any games' Mac or Linux versions. Starting February 1, subscription-specific downloads will be taken off the site, and Mac and Linux versions in particular will disappear altogether.

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LinuxGeek
4 days ago
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I've purchased stuff from Humble before because I wanted to support their philosophy. Not anymore.
freeAgent
3 days ago
If you are into TTRPGs, check out the Bundle of Holding. PDFs work on any OS :) https://bundleofholding.com/
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Toyota's chief scientist explains why maximum EV range isn't necessarily the best idea - Roadshow

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Gill Pratt explains the double-edged sword of electric range and how it could drag down a cleaner climate.

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LinuxGeek
4 days ago
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Battery technology just doesn't cut it for many people. I've driven gasoline vehicles more than 1000 miles in a day, making coast-to-coast weekend trips possible. It takes too long to recharge your car.
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Study: Two-thirds of Americans don't want an EV yet, and half won't pay extra for electrified

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2022 Ford F-150 Lightning pre-productionMost Americans still aren't ready to buy an EV, according to the Deloitte 2022 Global Automotive Study, which examines consumer perceptions of electrification and other technology movements in the auto industry. More than two-thirds (69%) of Americans said their next vehicle won't have any kind of electrification, while only 5% saw their next...
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LinuxGeek
6 days ago
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I've got to agree with the majority here. Have an EV now, but looking at replacing it with a gasoline vehicle. EV's are good for low maintenance, but the high licensing, registration, insurance, and electricity costs make them a poor choice for budget conscious Americans.
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Toyota is going to make you pay to start your car with your key fob

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Photo by Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Toyota is charging drivers for the convenience of using their key fobs to remotely start their cars. According to a report from The Drive, Toyota models 2018 or newer will need a subscription in order for the key fob to support remote start functionality.

As The Drive notes, buyers are given the option to choose from an array of Connected Services when purchasing a new Toyota, and one of those services — called Remote Connect — just so happens to include the ability to remotely start your car with your key fob.

Buyers are offered a free trial of Remote Connect, but the length of that trial depends on the audio package that’s included with the...

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LinuxGeek
36 days ago
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Unbelievable! No way that I'd pay a subscription fee for the remote start feature.
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